“President Rabinowitz responded to my question with, “You do matter, and every single student on this campus matters to me...I understand that it helps you in some way to say that we don’t think you’re as important as others...but you are...” This comment filled me with an anger I was unable to process to an extent that permitted me to write about it until this week. And even now, I still debate whether or not these feelings are eloquent enough for publication.”

“It’s really easy to feel like you haven’t done enough. Four years isn’t a lot of time, even if it can feel like it stretches on forever. Saying goodbye to college is hard, and as cheesy as it sounds, saying goodbye to The Chronicle is harder. I’ve been part of The Chronicle’s editorial board since September of freshman year, for me there is no Hofstra without The Chronicle.”

“Over the last few weeks, discussion of peace talks between North and South Korea have intensified, and it looks like a peace treaty ending the 72-year war will materialize in the near future. This comes at the end of nearly 15 years of intense sanctions by the U.N. and its member states to punish the North Korean military and political elite, who have spent the time establishing themselves as the most credible nuclear threat in the world since the collapse of the Soviet Union.”

“As the semester is winding down, I’ve noticed three consistent moods among people graduating on May 20: full acceptance that they’re graduating, half-acceptance and half-denial that they’re graduating or the joking thought that graduating on May 20 is the plan.”

“If you’re an early bird, which means you enjoy getting up before the sun, you get to live longer. If you’re a night owl, meaning you thrive after 9 p.m. and before the sun rises, you need to visit the doctor more and get a mental health evaluation. Good thing there are no studies condemning permanently exhausted pigeons, or people who feel tired all the time. I’m off the hook, then. As a former night owl who still has mental illness, though, this news does disturb me.”

"There is a lot to prove in college. With the tuition bill upward of $40,000, it is hard not to feel like you must always validate your worth as a student. However, in recent years this validation has taken an unhealthy turn. Many students look to stress levels or their choice of major to validate their time and money spent on school, or use their stress levels and workload to measure success."

"I wish to respond to some of the online comments made to Ms. Katie Krahulik’s article in the last issue of The Chronicle. I should also point out that I was not the genesis of the story. She had already begun investigating a story when she first approached me. I was happy to cooperate on the record. As a tenured faculty member in another school I am not worried about retribution. Had other people been willing to be quoted, the story may have focused less on me."

"I read with great interest “Tenured Zarb professors driven to resign.” I agree with the major point of the article, which is that there is an untenable atmosphere that has led people to retire or resign prematurely. Herman Berliner was serving as the dean during the period when at least five people resigned, retired or were terminated in one particular department. That is a significant percentage of faculty for this department.

"We agree with Dean Berliner that the article about the Frank G. Zarb School of Business appearing in the April 10, 2018 edition of The Hofstra Chronicle “is very misleading, inaccurate and unfair.” We are also responding because we have direct knowledge of the events cited in the article. However, due to the sensitivity and confidentiality of personnel issues, we are not able to comment in detail."