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Humans of Hofstra: Kaylor Dimes

Humans of Hofstra: Kaylor Dimes

Photo Courtesy of Kaylor Dimes

I want to go to law school. I always wanted to be a criminal defense attorney but the older I get, the more I’m leaning toward business law. So, like, administrative things, or maybe medical law because that’s really big. Hospitals are getting in more and more trouble doing things that are illegal. Also, it’s a connection to me because of my birth injury, my parents sued the hospital, [because] when I was born, I got stuck and instead of turning, they pulled my right arm. They tore all my nerves apart and broke my clavicle. What initially happens with brachial plexus, that’s what it’s called, is that it stretches the nerves so as you grow up, it kind of gets better. But since they tore them apart, I had to have nerve transplants and like 17 surgeries. I constantly go to occupational therapy off campus. I feel like because this happened at birth, I don’t really have an example of what life would be like without it and so I’ve just kind of learned to live with it. I feel like it’s harder here because I have to go out of my way to get things done. Back home, doctors were already there for me as I got older, but [I also] feel like it’s harder because there is more attention being brought to it. Everybody knew me [back home] and they knew what happened, but here people constantly ask me. It doesn’t necessarily bother me, but it gets frustrating. I’ve never been a person that, when somebody tells me something, I try to relate to them or tell them I know what they mean and I know how they feel. A lot of people will draw on events in their life and say, ‘This made me feel this way and it relates to your arm this way,’ which I disagree with, because, first of all, brachial plexus is not common. As far as people asking, it depends on the day and how they present the question. I feel like I try to put myself in other people’s shoes. I get [that] it looks weird [and] it looks different, so from their perspective it’s OK to ask because they’re curious.

Humans of Hofstra: Koorosh Leibowitz

Humans of Hofstra: Koorosh Leibowitz

Professor Spotlight: Brian McFadden’s series of fortunate events

Professor Spotlight: Brian McFadden’s series of fortunate events